Desktop Monitor TOS


#143

Glad to see you paint the insides white.


#144

That’s Great Sharon…


#145

It’s a seal primer inside and out except for the front of the monitor which needs a new hood when I get to it. I’ll actually be painting the inside of the monitor itself with a EMI/RFI shielding paint. I’ll be doing the painting of this when warmer weather hits but I wanted to put it together now after priming to start on the electronics so I can take it to a prop gathering this weekend.

Still lots of work to do before it is finished but here’s some shots of putting it together and firing it up for a first time bench test…

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#146

Wow…there it is …fired up… That look so great @DigiGal


#147

Very cool- you could do infinite monitor build inside monitor build etc-


#148

Wow, really nice work there.


#149

This is mind blowing sharon.


#150

Nice work, Sharon. Very clean and well thought out.


#151

Great job Sharon…
Can’t wait to see it…


#152

This is great! Did you ever mention what you’re using for the monitor?

I would think the perfect monitor (probably doesn’t exist) would have a very matte reflective quality.


#153

Thanks, There’s still a lot of finish work to go once warmer weather sets in but it’s a functional computer now. The last photo is actually online logged into TFW from the TOS Desktop Monitor/Computer and reading this thread.

I laid everything out so that the modules can easily be removed and re-assembled after final painting and external details are done. The switches are lightly epoxied in place so they’ll hold for function but can still be removed to paint. I don’t like the idea of fully epoxying them in place, I may seal threaded fasteners through the front of the base filling them so they’re not visible. Long term this will make for a better solution in case a switch needs to be replaced in the future.

Ordinarily I like to build props that are as close to screen used as possible, i.e.: not adding sound cards etc. to props that didn’t have them. However, since 5th grade when I really got into TOS I’ve thought it would be great to have a real computer like these in Star Trek. Thanks to the Mitch’s wonderful TOS Desktop Monitor Kit and today’s technology I realized now is the time to put together a grail prop with only some minimal external alterations.

I didn’t want to revert to a 4:3 aspect in today’s HD world, thus I ordered an HD 10.1" LCD Display Module (specs below) from eBay. In searching and studying specs I found one that closely fits Mitch’s kit with slight modification to the width of the kits monitor hood. (Found a close match and ordered direct from China to give it a whirl). Because the display module is slightly wider I removed the sides of the original hood. I’m planning to remove the top & bottom of the original to put in a new full hood. The MDF side pieces of the original hood broke in the process of removing them, I had also tried unsuccessfully to sand them wider to fit the display module when they were still glued in place.

I’ll order a custom sized piece of anti-reflective clear plexi from a framing shop to protect the display replacing the white plexi supplied with the kit. The aspect and sizing is different using a 16x9 HD Display so I’ll determine final sizing once the replacement hood is assembled and glued in place. Right now the LCD display module is protected with the glossy clear film supplied on it to keep it protected until final assembly. The clear anti-reflective art plexi will need a specially sized blue border decal on top of it as well.

Again my build requires modifications but it’s so worth it on this one. Hope to inspire others to explore what’s possible. There might even be a tablet that fits the kit or could be similarly modified to fit.

So here are the specs of the display unit I ordered direct from China…

10.1" TFT LCD Display Module 1080P HDMI+VGA+2AV

Display size 10.1 inches
Dimensions 228.6 × 149.2 × 2.39typ
Viewing area 216.96 (H) × 135.60 (V) mm
Resolution : 1280 × 800
Panel Type TFT
Display Color 16.7M (6bits + Hi-FRC)
Contrast Ratio 600:1
Brightness 350cd/m2
Interface Type Digital
The number of wiring 40 PIN LVDS
LED back light
Operating temperature -20 ℃ ~ 80 ℃

HDMI+VGA+2AV Driver Board:

Dimension: 90.57 X 65.60 X 12mm
Work Voltage: DC 12V
Up to Resolution: 7~22inch up to 1920*1080
Input: Dual/Single LVDS interface
Work Current: 200~250mA
Input Signal: HDMI VGA AV
Audio: Support
Remote: Optional
OSD: Support

Package Includes:

1 x 10.1" TFT Hig-Resolution Display Module
1 x HDMI+VGA+2AV Driver Board
1 x Keyboard with IR receiver
1 x 10 Pins Cable


#154

Totally amazing! WOW!!

Steve P


#155

I love it- you beat me to an idea for the screen cap. super nice work-


#156

Fantastic. I had assumed you were going to back light and get the shielding bit now.


#157

That is very cool Sharon.


#158

This is my first actual TFW post from the TOS Desktop Monitor/Computer pictured above. It is so neat actually using the prop as a computer.

edit to add:
Hmm, TOS Checkered Fabric Burke 116 Chair and a TOS Desktop Monitor/Computer with a TOS Logbook on the list after finishing this monitor has me longing to build a desk from the TOS Officer Quarters to go along with them.

Haven’t seen any plans available for these desks anywhere, can anyone share a link to dimensions or a build of one of these desks?


#159

You know Sharon, I think this is how James Cawley got started. I hope you have the space at your house for the full sets.


#160

@DigiGal - Sharon, did you sketch out a wiring diagram at any point? If so, would you share it.


#161

I didn’t actually have a need to sketch it out, had simply thought it through in advance all in my head.

edit to add
it’s really pretty simple but I could put together and share a block diagram of the layout when I some have time if that is helpful for others.

Currently exercising some UNIX enhancements to the computer. Adding external Bluetooth Speaker and three networked printers via Wi-Fi using CUPS.


#162

By request I’ve put together a quick block diagram to help visualize connecting the elements involved.

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